How To Serve Haitian Lunch Recipes Easy

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Haiti, the Pearl of the Antilles, boasts a rich culinary heritage influenced by African, French, and Arawak traditions. Haitian cuisine is known for its vibrant flavors, bold spices, and hearty dishes, perfect for a satisfying lunch. Today, we’ll embark on a delicious journey by exploring three popular Haitian lunch recipes: Pikliz, Haitian Black Beans (Pois Noir), and Diri ak Nwa (Black Rice and Peas).

Pikliz: A Spicy Pickled Veggie Sensation

Poul Nan Sos (Haitian Chicken in Sauce)
Poul Nan Sos (Haitian Chicken in Sauce)

Pikliz is a staple Haitian condiment, often served alongside main dishes. Its vibrant colors and tangy flavor add a refreshing kick to any lunch. Here’s what you’ll need:

Ingredients:

1 cabbage, thinly sliced

  • 2 carrots, julienned
  • 1 bell pepper (red, yellow, or orange), julienned
  • 1 scotch bonnet pepper, seeded and finely chopped (adjust for spice preference)
  • 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon white vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Black pepper to taste

  • Directions:

    1. In a large bowl, combine all vegetables.
    2. In a separate bowl, whisk together lime juice, vinegar, thyme, salt, and pepper.
    3. Pour the dressing over the vegetables and mix well.
    4. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, allowing the flavors to meld.

    Haitian Black Beans (Pois Noir)

    Pois Noir, meaning “black beans” in Haitian Creole, is a comforting and flavorful dish commonly served with rice.

    Ingredients:

    1 cup dried black beans, rinsed and picked over

  • 4 cups water
  • 1/2 pound smoked ham hock or smoked turkey neck (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 scotch bonnet pepper, seeded and chopped (adjust for spice preference)
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

  • Directions:

    1. In a large pot, combine black beans and water. Add the ham hock or turkey neck (if using) and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 1-2 hours, or until beans are tender. Remove and discard the meat (optional).
    2. Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add onion, garlic, bell pepper, and scotch bonnet pepper. Sauté for 5 minutes, until softened.
    3. Stir the sauteed vegetables into the cooked beans along with thyme, oregano, salt, and black pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook for 15 minutes, allowing the flavors to combine.

    Diri ak Nwa (Black Rice and Peas)

    Diri ak Nwa, translating to “black rice and peas” in Haitian Creole, is a popular and versatile side dish that pairs beautifully with various protein options.

    Ingredients:

    1 cup black rice, rinsed

  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1/2 cup dried black-eyed peas, rinsed and picked over
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

  • Directions:

    1. In a rice cooker or pot, combine black rice, vegetable broth, and black-eyed peas. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 45 minutes, or until rice and peas are tender.
    2. While the rice and peas cook, heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add onion, garlic, and bell pepper. Sauté for 5 minutes, until softened.
    3. Stir the sauteed vegetables, bay leaf, thyme, salt, and pepper into the cooked rice and peas. Fluff with a fork and serve.

    Nutrition Facts (per serving)

    Please note: These are approximate values and may vary depending on the specific ingredients used.

    Pikliz: Low in calories, fat, and carbohydrates. Good source of vitamins A, C, and K.

  • Haitian Black Beans (Pois Noir): Good source of protein, fiber, and iron.
  • Diri ak Nwa (Black Rice and Peas): Whole-grain source of fiber and essential nutrients.

  • Conclusion