Thanksgiving Feast For One: Simple And Delicious Solutions

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Thanksgiving is a time for family, friends, and of course, delicious food. But what if you’re flying solo this year? Don’t worry, you can still enjoy a festive and flavorful Thanksgiving dinner without the hassle of cooking for a crowd. This guide will walk you through a simple, yet satisfying Thanksgiving meal, perfect for one.

The Menu:

How Much Food to Make for Thanksgiving
How Much Food to Make for Thanksgiving

Herb-Roasted Turkey Breast: A classic Thanksgiving centerpiece, but in a smaller portion.

  • Creamy Mashed Potatoes: Comfort food heaven, easily scaled down for one.
  • Honey-Glazed Carrots: A sweet and healthy side dish.
  • Easy Stuffing: Because stuffing is a must-have, even for a solo feast.
  • Light and Fluffy Dinner Rolls: Warm bread rolls to complete the meal.

  • Getting Started:

    Before diving into recipes, a few tips:

    Shop smart: Buy smaller portions of ingredients or pre-cut vegetables to avoid waste.

  • Leftovers are your friend: Plan to have leftovers! Enjoy them for lunch the next day or get creative and transform them into a new dish.
  • Embrace convenience: Don’t be afraid to use pre-made ingredients like mashed potato mix or stuffing mix to save time.

  • The Recipes:

    Now, let’s get cooking!

    Herb-Roasted Turkey Breast (Single Serving)

    Ingredients:

    1 boneless, skinless turkey breast half (about 1 pound)

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • Salt and pepper to taste

  • Directions:

    1. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).
    2. Pat the turkey breast dry with paper towels. Rub with olive oil and sprinkle with thyme, rosemary, salt, and pepper.
    3. Place the turkey breast in a small baking dish and roast for 30-35 minutes, or until cooked through (internal temperature reaches 165°F (74°C).
    4. Let the turkey rest for 5 minutes before slicing.

    Creamy Mashed Potatoes (Single Serving)

    Ingredients:

    1 medium potato, peeled and diced

  • 1/4 cup milk (or low-fat broth)
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • Salt and pepper to taste

  • Directions:

    1. Boil the potato in salted water until tender, about 10-12 minutes.
    2. Drain the potato and return it to the pot. Mash with milk and butter until smooth and creamy.
    3. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

    Honey-Glazed Carrots (Single Serving)

    Ingredients:

    6 baby carrots, peeled and halved

  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/2 tablespoon melted butter
  • Pinch of cinnamon

  • Directions:

    1. In a small saucepan, combine carrots with a splash of water. Bring to a simmer and cook until tender-crisp, about 5-7 minutes.
    2. In a small bowl, whisk together honey, butter, and cinnamon.
    3. Drain the carrots and toss them with the honey glaze. Heat over low heat for an additional minute, allowing the glaze to thicken slightly.

    Easy Stuffing (Single Serving)

    Ingredients:

    1/2 cup dry stuffing mix

  • 1/4 cup chicken broth
  • 1 tablespoon chopped onion (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped celery (optional)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

  • Directions:

    1. In a small bowl, combine stuffing mix, chicken broth, and optional chopped vegetables.
    2. Microwave for 1-2 minutes, or until heated through. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

    Light and Fluffy Dinner Rolls (Single Serving)

    Ingredients:

    1 can (1.5 oz) refrigerated crescent roll dough

  • Melted butter (for brushing)

  • Directions:

    1. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).
    2. Unroll the crescent roll dough and separate into triangles. Brush each triangle with melted butter.
    3. Roll up the triangles from the base to the point, forming crescent rolls.
    4. Place the rolls on a baking sheet and bake for 8-10 minutes, or until golden brown.

    Nutrition Facts:

    While indulging is part of the Thanksgiving spirit, keeping an eye on portion sizes is still important. This single-serving menu is a good starting point, but adjust the ingredients based on your dietary needs.

    Conclusion: